Abstract Digital Bum

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Discovering the Blending Tool!!

I discovered, what became my  favourite technique, picking out the colours in an image and layering them up, to create a stylised look… who knew it could get better!!

I found the blending tool, and it has changed my life! I  normally struggle to create life-like drawings because i don’t seem to have the patience to commit the amount of time needed to produce realistic work, so i usually opt for a more abstract drawing. I found this tool amazing! It meant i could still use the methods i like that are quite quick and stylised (and save this image so i have a before and after), then blend the colours together to have the final image that is more refined.

I get a lot out of the process because i am able to watch my drawings grow and progress, layer by layer.

Discovering the Blending Tool!!

Shaded Bums from Sculpture

This is fast becoming my favourite technique!! You can really break down the colours in an image and build it up to see each individual section.

Shaded Bums from Sculpture

Liz Wilson

I stumbled across these works by Liz Wilson on my reader. I loved them as soon as i saw them. Apparently they were created using the ‘Paper’ app that you can get on your ipad. I thought they were incredible and as the titles state, made me immediately think of Matisse.

matisse-like nude
1. Liz Wilson (Wilson, 2015)

The way the app joins up the sections that are being drawn is interesting because it creates big block sections, yet still allows the shape to be visible and take centre stage. The transparency of each section is wonderful as well, because it allows shapes underneath to be seen also.

2. Liz Wilson (Wilson, 2015)

I love every single one of these drawings and i really like that they are digital because it shows off a similar technique to that of Matisse’s in a different light. It shows how diverse it can be.

Each of the drawings show a very curvy subject with rounded hips. This shape is very flattering and feminine. Interestingly, the harshness of the straight lines from the individual shapes works well with the curves and make them more obvious.

just another nude
3. Liz Wilson (Wilson, 2015)

 

 

This image is quite different to the others as there are solid blocks of colour, but this one has a simple outline to add extra pieces of detail. It is very simplistic, yet so effective. My favourite bit of this is the solid white block in the centre. I like the way the coloured sections frame this piece.

 

 

 

 

References –

  1. Wilson, L. (2015, 20th May). Matisse-like Nude. [Weblog]. Retrieved 27 March 2016, from https://lizstrongwilsondesign.wordpress.com/2015/05/20/matisse-like-nude/
  2. Wilson, L. (2015, 20th May). More Matisse-like Nude. [Weblog]. Retrieved 27 March 2016, from https://lizstrongwilsondesign.wordpress.com/2015/05/20/more-matisse-like-nudes/
  3. Wilson, L. (2015, 20th June). Just Another Nude. [Weblog]. Retrieved 27 March 2016, from https://lizstrongwilsondesign.wordpress.com/2015/06/20/just-another-nude/
Liz Wilson

Figure & Form

Figure and form have been explored throughout humanity, whether it be through symbolic meaning or by exploring ‘beauty’. It is interesting to see how the figures alter through the years and regions.


 

Palaeolithic Art

These figures are very shapely; curvaceous; volumptuous and rounded. They are steeped in meaning and symbolism which, for me, makes them for more beautiful!


 

 

Neolithic Art and Egyptian Art

Left – The shape is very basic and almost looks printed, even though it has been painted to be very shapely and have big thighs.

Right – This figure is pear-shaped, with angular curves. It is not as rounded as the previous examples and is far more stylised.


 

Pre-Hellenistic Art

First of all, I FOUND A MAN’S BUM! (they are weirdly hard to find)

They are both very smooth, almost appearing real as if they are actual people. These examples feel more realistic because they have been worked into so much in order to get the ‘perfection’ that was desired.


 

 

Roman and Spanish Art

Left – I quite like the rough textures in this one, which has no relevance to the bum, but i feel it adds to the realism of the piece. The figure is quite square-hipped and nips in at the waist.

Right – This way of lying down is very flattering as it accentuates the curve of the hip which you can see from how the spine bends round. This gives her a very curvy shape.


 

French Art

Both of these images are painted from ordinary life settings. They look natural and not set up or ‘posed’. This is great because you get to see the bums as they are normally, not forced to look more curved and full.


 

 

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Fritz Wotruba (b.1907): Standing Figure. Breccia. 1953-5. Musee National d’Art Moderne, Paris.  P299.

European Sculpture

This form is an abstract of the human figure; a much simplified version that rethinks the ‘figure’ and transforms it into something unconventionally beautiful.

 


 

British Sculpture

I have always been a fan of Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth (i think you have to be if you come from Yorkshire), the way they both turn figures into unconventional abstract forms is unique. Sometimes they still look like the human body, being obvious what has inspired the work, whereas other times they are so strange and disjointed from their inspiration that you aren’t quite sure where it has come from. Until, you see the prefiguring chain of sketches and drawings, which showcases the whole journey undertaken, up to the final outcome.

All images from this post were sourced from –

Lloyd, C. (1979). A Picture History of Art. Oxford: Phaidon Press Limited.

Figure & Form